Tagged: health

Release

This piece is my follow-up to “Under Pressure,” featured as a guest post on J.A. Allen’s fabulous blog.


 

A very efficient woman buzzes around me, her motherly gray bangs swaying with every maneuver. “Considering your age, we’re going to perform the scan, as well as an ultrasound.” You’d think she was twittering around the kitchen, baking cookies for her grandkids. Instead, she’s buffing the space-age machine that towers imposingly over us. High technology that cows me into submission. My kaleidoscopic internal world is irrelevant in this sterile, colorless examination room.

I’m standing topless, hands behind my back. A mannequin with foldable, poseable limbs. Expert hands guide the lead apron across my lower body. She manipulates me, tucking my breasts between the plates. The top plate is transparent, and she sends it down with a tap of her foot. My glands, impossibly flat.

No joy, sensuality, life. Still youthful and pert, they haven’t yet known the searching mouth of a suckling baby. They’ve never produced milk, never given life. Under this fluorescent light, they’re no longer fleshly beautiful symbols of my femininity or fertility.  Here, they’re just a piece of meat, in a clinical setting. Like a sample in a petri dish, ready for fastidious, detached scientific observation.

Next room, another machine. Doctor enters. Arms up, supine. The ultrasound wand glides over my sore mountains. He stares at the screen, and I twist my neck up to watch along. He pauses at the sight of each furry black cloud. Two clicks measure them. Glide, click-click.

“You have benign cysts. It’s common, one in three women has them. They may get inflamed and sore, so we’ll keep an eye on them. There is nothing cancerous here.”

He wishes me a good-day, and doesn’t even shake my hand. I suppose it’s not medical protocol to shake a patient’s hand after you’ve prodded about and scrutinized the ins and outs of her funbags.

White coattails flap crisply out the door. I scrape the viscous gel off my chest and dress myself. Strange. Just beyond that door, I’m expected to observe a modicum of physical modesty, yet my rainbow voice can come back. Here, I am reticent in my nudity.

Back into the clean, fluorescent lobby, where I melt into a bucket chair. Vacant. Depleted.

The secretary mispronounces my name, and I answer anyway.

I take my charts, and the smile I give her feels awkwardly distorted.

I step out of the cool white clinic and back into the searing, chartreuse summer air. Breathe deep, hiccup. Sweet tears of relief. My weak protest mantra “I’m too young for this” that had marched so defiantly through my head has dissolved, overtaken by my mother’s insistent wisdom: “Check yourself regularly!”

I’m glad I listened.

Deny

No, no no…

 

My class was meant to start 2 minutes ago.

I’m upstairs, fumbling through my bag, ripping through the contents.

Where is it…

I’m aggressively breathing, forcing air through my constricting airway.  I feel flushed, my heart is racing, and hot tears are starting to erupt.

No.

I find my homeopathy tablets and shove some under my tongue.  Breathe, take control.

I feel trapped.  I’m deeply uncomfortable.  I want 5 minutes to go outside and breathe.  I want to walk and keep walking until I get home.  I want to walk straight out of this reality, if it means I can get myself back.  But for now, I have to swallow those needs and do my job.  The only thing I can control right now is my breath.

I crunch through what’s left of the tablets, take a gulp of water, and paste on a smile.  I descend to greet my student, who looks a bit annoyed at being kept waiting.  I’m 5 minutes late.

A thickly sweet voice says, “Thanks for your patience.  Shall we begin our class now?”  A body goes into a classroom.

Me dissolves.  Breath remains.

Care

Sometimes, things start to feel lackluster, and one day blends unremarkably into another.  I’m on auto-pilot, and the urge to complain comes about more frequently than I’d like.  My head is filled with cotton, and the outside world looks bland and uninviting.

Ennui:  a feeling of dissatisfaction and bored, weary listlessness due to a lack of excitement and stimulation.  Also associated with cynicism, world-weariness, and self-indulgence.  I’m so deep, man.  I’ve got a bad case of ennui.  It’s a French word, look it up.

Ugh.  I’m giving myself douche chills.  I can’t stand myself when I feel this way.  In order to combat this feeling of stagnation and boredom, I pull out my mental list.  I pare things down, take a deep breath, and try to look at myself, now.  What is special about this moment?  Is there something I can indulge in, to appreciate my world and bring things into color and focus?

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This morning, while shaking off the remnants of a nightmare, I poured myself a bowl of Cocoa Krispies.  I hadn’t tasted these babies since I was a kid, and the silly monkey on the box called out to me at the grocery store earlier this week.  In the gray quiet shadows of the morning, I curled up onto my couch with my bowl of sugary nostalgia, and chowed down.  Something lifted in my heart, and I felt a nice warmth there.  Sure, I’m shirking my healthy-living promise to myself; but sometimes, a guilty pleasure is just what you need.  Every chocolatey morsel of goodness brought a new idea to mind.

I recommend everyone make themselves a list.  You might be surprised at how small a gesture it takes to show yourself a little loving compassion.

 

For me, it could be…

 

The nostalgic crunch of breakfast cereal

A piece of whole-grain bread topped with a chunk of sharp English cheddar

Gliding my new gorgeous Micron pen across the smooth paper in my new notebook

Caressing the pages of a new journal, deciding what its purpose shall be

Burning a stick of incense I’ve been saving from Japan

Admiring a rare sight here: the frosted white treetops on a frigid morning

Brushing through my hair, adding oil to make it shine

Painting my nails clear in an effort to stop biting them

Pouring myself a finger of Cuban rum at the end of a 6-day work week

Wearing an outfit that makes me feel like my final form

Quenching my thirst with a large, perfectly cool glass of water

Looking up a new subject to learn about (at the moment: 18th century cooking and re-enacting)

Walking through the garden, smelling the herbs

Planning an upcoming trip or outing

 

I’m talking about self-care:  doing things because they make you feel good, and for no other reason.  I’ve made a list, and when things start to look gray and I need a pick-me-up, I refer to my list of comforts.

Now, on this gray Sunday afternoon shrouded in fog, I’m off to another one of my comforts:  gathering around the table with family, and enjoying a meal.  Today’s meal:  pot-au-feu.  Please excuse me while I run off to stuff my face as an act of self-kindness.

 

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another loving act:  getting a close-up view of some flowers