Tagged: solitude

In/coherent

oilspill

oilspill

 

Seemingly opposing variables get muddied together, but I want them to stand alone, distinct, clear.

I’m getting vertigo, trying to make sense of incoherencies, those things that are intangibly mutating. I’m repulsed, alarmed by that which is illogical.

It’s unsettling to admit that I only know what feels good, and what doesn’t.


 

I’m walking downtown, foggy-headed, untethered.

 

Busy-minded people blur by. I look down at the ground as I walk. I can’t bear to meet people’s eyes, to see the endless parade of the same vacant gaze.

The ground is littered with their filth. Cigarette butts tossed away and stomped underfoot, like all our dirty secrets. Forgotten scraps of paper, napkins kissed with lipstick. Styrofoam pellets that will outlive us all.

Just ahead, a parked motorbike jumps to life, revving its ugly whine. After it pulls away, I pause in front of its former resting place. Spilled oil is smeared all over the sidewalk, from it and many others like it.

I’m surprised to find it beautiful.

Variables align into one clear moment that pierces through the blur.

This feels good.


Through the fog, brilliant moments still make their way in.

They always do.

 

Sing

I wake up to the sound of the wind screaming outside.  I’m breathing heavily from the nightmare I’ve just been freed from.  The window shade is rattling, and my windows are creaking.

The wind moans over the sound of the grains in my bread crackling in the toaster.  It haunts me as I get dressed and zip up my boots.  As strong as the wind is now, it’s nothing compared to what I’ll meet on the walk to the station.

I carefully tie my hair and scarf to keep them under control, and my resolve is firm when I turn the key to lock my door.  No turning back now.

 

I ascend the hill near my sheep buddies, and their matted wool and stoic gazes are unmoving in this tempest.  Spindly branches whip above my head, and I skirt quickly away from the groaning trees.

My usually peaceful country path is now unfamiliar in its aggression.  The wind is so powerful, I can’t walk straight, and I fear it’ll rip my contact lenses straight out of my eyes.  Wincing into each step, I hear nothing but howling in my ears.

Nothing but howling?

I can fix that.

I start singing.  Each gust threatens to cut off my breath, but I can’t miss this perfect opportunity to belt out some great disco hits.  This is a walk from hell, but I can either bitch and moan into the breeze, or smile and sing into it.  The latter is way more fun.

I imagine a winegrower sipping his morning coffee, further down in the valley, catching the tune as it’s carried over on a strong gust.  He taps his foot and hums along, in harmony with my vocals.  The wind screams for an encore.  I take a bow, board my train, and leave it wanting more.

Wade

It’s an average weekday.  The post-holiday slump, the hangover of end-of-year introspection sticking like sludge in my step.  What happened to all those grandiose promises I wooed myself with?  I thought things would be different this year.  But perhaps I’ve seduced myself back into torpid complacency.  Safe, sweet complacency.

I step into a tobacconist’s to buy revenue stamps, and I’ve got 1 euro change.  “Keep the euro, and give me one of those,” I point to a scratch ticket, and muster up an awkward smile.  The clerk hands me my stamps and the ticket, and I look up into his face.  Mouth turned up, eyes turned down.  There is no familiarity or warmth in that hollow, forced gesture.  My own tight smile dries up as I turn on my heel and step out of line.

I duck around the corner to scratch my lotto ticket, back turned to the world.  For some reason, I don’t want anyone to catch me in the act, to see the faint glint of hope in my eye as I try my luck.  I scratch, and the lucky number comes up:  I’m a 1 euro winner.  One euro in, one euro out.  I’ve broken even.

Now, I ask:  Do I try my luck, and get another ticket?  I realize I’m already lucky to have broken even, and I should quit now.  But quitting now is tantamount to complacency!  Why not just try?  I’ll never know if I settle for breaking even.

Approach another tobacconist, exchange the winning ticket for a new one.  Scratch, scratch, scratch.  Loser.  Guess I shouldn’t have taken my chances, after all.

 

I realize that this is about more than a stupid lotto ticket.

 

Stuff the loser in my pocket, and start sauntering toward work.  On the way, a man with a misshapen head and heavy jowls is playing accordion.  Under the bland, gray sky, it sounds like an elegiac processional hymn.  The gray sky starts melting into me, turning it all into one homogeneous paste.  I wade on.

Solo

find myself

The house is quiet. Slide the wooden door closed, sit on my tuffet. Turn on my flashlight hanging by a string above, and open up a book. The inside of my closet door is decorated with song lyrics and stickers. This is my space.

Later, I expanded my territory to the basement. Despite the fact that I was on an ever-vigilant watch for the boogieman coming around the corner, it was my quiet hideout. I had a carpet that was older than I was, and the oil tank took up half of the room. One yellow bulb illuminated the space. But it was mine.

I’ve always appreciated solitude.

When I was in school, I dreaded hearing the teacher say the words: “Choose a partner.” I enjoyed working on my own. Team sports made me anxious. I preferred individual sports. Solo activities like reading, drawing, painting, doing crafts, music, sewing, and writing were what made me feel happy and fulfilled.

Later, this would embolden me to satisfy my curiosity and see the world.  Why wait around for someone else to join me?  I am capable of fulfilling this dream on my own.

¤

Now, I’m 30. I stamp my train ticket, find a seat to plonk myself down in. I watch the world pass me by, and imagine myself flying over the fields, frolicking and dancing around barefoot. I see my reflection in the train window, and I can see those other Mes in a kaleidoscope of brilliant reflections. I nod, they nod, we all nod. This feels right.

I am free to do what I want, travel where I want, and live how I choose.

The question is: Where to go from here?

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where to next?